EN | AM

UN in Armenia


Armenia’s UN Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) is the programme of cooperation between the UN system and the Government of Armenia.

The United Nations is an international organization founded in 1945 after the Second World War. It brings together 193 member states (see the Member States Flags and UN System Chart  posters) to maintain international peace and security; develop friendly relations among nations; and promote social progress, better living standards and human rights.

Armenia was admitted to the United Nations on 2 March 1992, and on December of that year the United Nations established an office in Yerevan. Since then Armenia has signed and ratified a number of international treaties.

The UN Country Team is headed by UN Resident Coordinator and consists of 15 specialized agencies, funds and programmes.In addition, the World Bank (WB), International Finance Corporation (IFC) and International Monetary Fund (IMF) have offices in the country.


UN Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF)

This Development Assistance Framework, agreed between the Government of the Republic of Armenia (GoA) and the United Nations (UN) on 31 July 2015, is a strategic programme framework that will guide the cooperation between the GoA and UN from 2016 until 2020. The framework underlines Armenia’s vision and commitment to improve the living standards of the peoples of Armenia, while taking into account the realities and opportunities of its standing as a lower middle income country. It will rely on creative and innovative approaches and reach out to non-traditional development partners and donors.

The seven key results expected from development cooperation, called outcomes, were identified jointly by the GoA, the UNCT, and civil society. They are aligned with the priorities established in the Armenia Prospective Development Strategy 2014-2025 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The outcomes are shaped by the comparative advantages of the UN Country Team to support the achievement of the Post-2015 Agenda, as starting 2016, SDGs will be the main foundation for the UN work atthe country level. The UNDAF also embeds the five programming principles: a human-rights-based approach, gender equality, environmental sustainability, results-based management and capacity development. The outcomes are focused on advancing equitable economic growth, improving environmental management, strengthening accountability, and delivering quality social services. Strategies for each outcome share a common focus on reaching vulnerable groups and assisting the GoA to meet its human rights obligations. The UNDAF outcomes are grouped under four pillars:

1. Equitable, sustainable economic development and poverty reduction

2. Democratic governance

3. Social services and inclusion

4. Environmental sustainability and resilience-building

The detailed UNDAF results matrices are available here:


Sustainable Development Goals - 2030 Global Development Agenda

On 1 January, 2016, the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development—adopted by world leaders in September 2015 at an historic UN Summit — officially came into force. Over the next fifteen years, with these new Goals that universally apply to all, countries will mobilize efforts to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities and tackle climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind.

The SDGs build on the success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and aim to go further to end all forms of poverty. The new Goals are unique in that they call for action by all countries, poor, rich and middle-income to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and addresses a range of social needs including education, health, social protection, and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and environmental protection.

At the global level, the 17 SDGs with 169 targets


Background to the 2030 Agenda

In September 2015, more than 150 world leaders attended the UN Sustainable Development Summit held at UN Headquarters in New York to formally adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda.

Agreed by the 193 Member States of the UN, the Agenda, entitled Transforming Our World: 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” consists of a Declaration, 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets (the 230 indicators are not completely publicized yet), a section on means of implementation and renewed global partnership, and a framework for review and follow-up.


The Millennium Development Goals

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which produced the most successful anti-poverty movement in history, served as a springboard for the Sustainable Development Agenda. The MDGs were retrieved from the Millennium Declaration.

Only two short decades ago, nearly half of the developing world lived in extreme poverty. Since the MDGs, the number of people now living in extreme poverty has declined by more than half, falling from 1.9 billion in 1990 to 836 million in 2015. Gender parity in primary school has been achieved in the majority of countries and women have gained ground in parliamentary representation over the past 20 years in nearly 90% of the 174 countries with data.

However, progress has been uneven across regions and countries, leaving significant gaps. Millions of people are being left behind, especially the poorest and those disadvantaged because of their sex, age, disability, ethnicity or geographic location. Moreover, climate change is now affecting every country on every continent, and the poorest and most vulnerable people are being impacted the most.

Sustainable Development

Since the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development —the Earth Summit— in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the world identified a new pathway to human well-being, that of sustainable development. The concept of sustainable development, presented in Agenda 21, is defined as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

The new sustainable development agenda builds on the outcome of the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development, the 2010 Summit on the MDGs, the outcome of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development in 2012 (Rio+20) and the views of people around the world.

In “The future We Want,” the outcome document of Rio+20, UN member States agreed to establish an open working group to develop a set of sustainable development goals. The proposal of the open working group, finalized in July 2014, is the core of the new 2030 Agenda for sustainable development.

In September 2015, more than 150 world leaders attended the UN Sustainable Development Summit held at UN Headquarters in New York to formally adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda.

Agreed by the 193 Member States of the UN, the Agenda, entitled “Transforming Our World: 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” consists of a Declaration, 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets, a section on means of implementation and renewed global partnership, and a framework for review and follow-up.

The Millennium Development Goals

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which produced the most successful anti-poverty movement in history, serve as a springboard for the Sustainable Development Agenda.

Only two short decades ago, nearly half of the developing world lived in extreme poverty. Since the MDGs, the number of people now living in extreme poverty has declined by more than half, falling from 1.9 billion in 1990 to 836 million in 2015. Gender parity in primary school has been achieved in the majority of countries and women have gained ground in parliamentary representation over the past 20 years in nearly 90% of the 174 countries with data.

However, progress has been uneven across regions and countries, leaving significant gaps. Millions of people are being left behind, especially the poorest and those disadvantaged because of their sex, age, disability, ethnicity or geographic location. Moreover, climate change is now affecting every country on every continent, and the poorest and most vulnerable people are being impacted the most.

Sustainable Development

Since the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development —the Earth Summit— in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the world identified a new pathway to human well-being, that of sustainable development. The concept of sustainable development, presented in Agenda 21, is defined as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

The new sustainable development agenda builds on the outcome of the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development, the 2010 Summit on the MDGs, the outcome of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development in 2012 (Rio+20) and the views of people around the world.

In “The future We Want,” the outcome document of Rio+20, UN member States agreed to establish an open working group to develop a set of sustainable development goals. The proposal of the open working group, finalized in July 2014, is the core of the new 2030 Agenda for sustainable development.

- See more at: http://www.un.am/en/news/260#sthash.zGHOJDCt.dpuf

Linked Pages